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> It might be happening to video games., Observation
sere
post Jul 22 2015, 04:19 AM
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I've made my way back to the ACE forums and wanted to take a stab at a new topic. It's about the video game renaissance that could very well be taking place. If it is taking place, then it's definitely rooted in Central and South America. If not renaissance then perhaps "Third Rome" after Japan and "the West".

Technology keeps improving but creativity seems to have gotten shallow and any sort of soul seems to be dwindling when held to shareholders' prerogatives. The spirit, sweat, and blood from both Capcom and Konami have been pushed aside for those very shareholders' prerogatives and now we have Igarashi, Inafune, and soon Kojima, going to Kickstarter just to make games using the forumulas they pioneered but would have never had heart if made under the roofs of the companies they themslelves helped raise to greatness. For different example, games like "Code of Princess" and "Bravely Default" don't feel like fresh improvements upon and old formula but rather sophisticated imitation bordering on hyperreality. First party Nintendo looks about the same and bankrupt as ever (and then there's the new "metroid"). Anything mainstream from "the West" is likely to be rehashed generica or "safe-approach" blandness. This isn't even considering the influx of indie-retro throwbacks or the insatiable iap worms that infested the mobile platform beyond cure. Should I mention Zombies?

I am underexposed to and unsure of what video games come from Central or South America but the little bit I have experienced has been fresh and exciting. Even the "at-first-seems-hollow" indie-retro stuff like "Oniken" and "Odallus", despite their trappings, practically ooze passion and soul! Yet most anything else indie, when coming USA/the West, is a rogue-like for the sake of being rogue-like without much else going for it.

I saw the video for Carlos Bordeau project and wondered why 80-90% of E3 material couldn't instill a similar feeling of curiosity. Do we really need to be wowed by fake gameplay tech demos again and again at the cost of fun and imagination? The focus on realism just trumps too much and the onset of the VR revival won't help. I suppose as an industry, video games are suffering a decay in both creativity and quality with only a few exceptions here and there (I do love Witcher 3 for so many reasons) to keep things interesting and worthwhile. It's as if the places in the world where video games were once like garden harvests are now compost landfills for discarded franchises. There, it's stifled by an even greater stench of the rotting corpse that wears the bloated visage of "innovation".


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-sere
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tschumann
post Jul 23 2015, 06:31 AM
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I don't play enough games or read about them enough to have a good idea of what is going on, but I think your summation of things is accurate - it is all about keeping the shareholders happy for big companies, and there do seem to be a lot of indie-retro throw-backs. Zombies seemed to have dropped off in the last couple of years though.
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Carlos Bordeu
post Jul 28 2015, 09:19 AM
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Hi Sere. I'm glad to hear you find my game concept as unique as you do. smile.gif

I unfortunately think that most games will continue to be on the "safe" side of creativity because originality doesn't guarantee sales... zombies and dinosaurs do. dry.gif

I really agree with you on the general sentiment of your post, but I have to say that if most consumers wanted innovation and uniqueness, then the games industry would change and cater to those demands. For instance Zeno Clash is a very, very niche IP and the majority of players just brush it off as "a weird game". We have some really passionate fans who love our work and are very vocal, but they are a fraction of the people who would buy "Zombies vs Ninjas 3" (I hope that doesn't really exist tongue.gif ).

The way I see it the market is so crowded that catering to niches allows us to do our stuff and be successful enough to continue with our creative work (a lot of studios that are making "me too" games are dying with no one ever hearing anything about them - so that isn't such a safe business plan always).

I certainly would love to see the renaissance that you write about - but it is my opinion that it would still be a small segment of the industry pushing for these unique titles while the rest pretty much remains very similar to what we have today.
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sere
post Aug 1 2015, 06:13 AM
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QUOTE (Carlos Bordeu @ Jul 28 2015, 09:19 AM) *
...but I have to say that if most consumers wanted innovation and uniqueness, then the games industry would change and cater to those demands.


Very true, sometimes romanticizing blinds us completely (but it's often worth it). The demand that the industry caters to isn't the only demand, though. The industry, so to speak, has become a sign of consumption itself as a driving force, thereby stripping demand of its meaning and possibly perverting the purpose of production (in a world that at least recognizes the idea of renaissance and its possibility). This is half the cause resulting into the saturation of "me too" indie games and annual Call of Duty. Thankfully, there is something out there to grant the wishes of just about anybody, no matter how niche their tastes.

I have always feared, as well as hoped, that the video game industry could suffer a death similar to comic books in the 90's. Overpriced bite-sized DLC, perpetual rehash, excessive remakes and general decline in quality seems awfully similar to the multiple chrome, gatefold, or holographic covers that were all released for the exact same issue. If it were not for the things that were made without concern for typical demand and consumption, comic books would have never recovered and video games would be doomed indefinitely.


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-sere
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